Course 2: Final Project

May 28, 2020
Digital Citizenship Group Project

Digital Citizenship UbD Plan

Our Process

For this group project, I teamed up with Erika and Holly (co-workers) who originally reached out to me. It came about quite naturally because we all teach second-grade. Our communication began through email and eventually, we were able to connect through WhatsApp as well.

When it was time to decide what type of project we would do, we were all on the same track as far as doing something with Digital Citizenship. We had all agreed that Digital Citizenship Education was something that could be improved upon at both of our schools. We quickly decided we would complete Option 1 and we began looking for resources that were already available.

I knew that Common Sense Media had its own Digital Citizenship resources, but I had never used them so I started looking there. After skimming a few lessons, I was happily surprised to see how easy the slides made teaching Digital Citizenship.

Then I reached out to a colleague with is a COETAIL alum and asked her if she had any resources. She pointed me to Be Internet Awesome. Another awesome resource that makes teaching Digital Citizenship easy!

Eventually, Erika created a list of the resources we had been gathering and this got us organized and ready to map out a plan. Once we decided we would create a two-week unit plan, we started to fill out our plan with more details. We decided to focus on four main topics:

  1. Internet Safety
  2. Private Information
  3. Digital Footprint
  4. Cyberbullying

By completing daily lessons and activities, students will end this unit with a greater understanding of what it takes to be good digital citizens and how to help others be good digital citizens.

Contributions

Many people might think it would be difficult to collaborate with people in three different countries, but it was actually quite easy. My group communicated effectively by responding to emails, text messages, and comments left on Docs in a timely manner. Each member of the group contributed and utilized their strengths. Holly has a great eye for detail, Erika is well-organized, and I enjoy finding good resources. We made a great team!

By collaborating, we were able to plan the unit out much quicker than if we would have done it alone. We were able to bounce ideas off of one another and share our resources.

Person in Blue Denim Jeans Sitting on Floor Using Macbook Air
Google Docs allowed for easy global collaboration.
Photo by Andrew Neel from Pexels

Collaboration gives you a greater perspective. This is one of the greatest benefits. Having multiple eyes on one thing helps avoid having gaps or wholes in the plan. For example, I created a culminating activity for our unit plan. After looking over the documents in our plan, Holly noticed my culminating activity did not have directions on it. If I did not have the extra pair of eyes looking over these documents, this would have gone unnoticed.

The most valuable resource that all teachers have is each other. Without collaboration, our growth is limited to our own perspectives.

Robert John Meehan

Let it grow!

Since I have two weeks of school left and I’ve finished teaching my Math curriculum for the school year, I am going to try this unit out with my class. I actually launched it on Friday and the students are super interested! They had lots of questions and comments after we watched a BrainPOP jr. video on Internet Safety. This is yet another example of how the work I do in COETAIL directly impacts my students. I love being able to use what I create in this program!

My hope is that next year I can encourage more teachers to start teaching Digital Citizenship. I’d love to get my school involved in a Digital Citizenship Week. I think that could be a great start to getting more teachers and students thinking about the topic. I saw that Common Sense Media celebrates this week from October 19-23 and they have a ton of resources for teachers that make it easy to do! Hopefully, this will be the start of something bigger.

May 17, 2020

Creating a Culture of THINKers

Preparing students for the world they live in now can be a challenge; especially when many educators did not grow up with access to computers, cellphones, or social media. At my school, I am considered one of the younger staff members (I am 36). I never had any lessons in school on responsible technology use or how to discern factual information from fake news. I also wasn’t handed a laptop in 2nd grade.

Facebook became a thing when I was halfway through college, I got my first cellphone when I was nineteen, and I did not have my own computer until I graduated from college. Oh, how times have changed!

My second graders now have Chromebooks at school and some even have their own cellphones. A wealth of information is literally at their fingertips. As an educator in the 21st Century, regardless of my own background with technology, it is one of my jobs to help my students navigate the world they are living in-to create a culture of THINKers.

Responsible Use

Many schools have some form of a technology agreement or responsible use form that students complete at the beginning of the school year. Each year we go over the Dos and Don’ts of computer and internet use and safety. Students and parent sign the agreement, I post it in the classroom, and refer back to it when issues arise.

CISH’s Reception-Grade 2 Tech Agreement

I also use the THINK acronym throughout the year to help students make good choices before speaking, acting, or posting. One girl in my class even made a mini-poster for each student to have on their desk as a reminder.

Think Before You Speak Printable Posters | School signs, Teaching ...
Image by Teach Junkie.

Is it enough?

I ask this question, but I already know the answer. I am not doing enough to prepare my students for the digital world they currently live in. Sharing a tech agreement and teaching students to THINK is NOT enough. Students need to be taught not told what to do. The questions we should all be asking is:

How do we ensure that every child has access to the skills and experiences needed to become a full participant in the social, cultural, economic, and political future of our society?

How do we ensure that every child has the ability to articulate his or her understanding of how media shapes perceptions of the world?


How do we ensure that every child has been socialized into the emerging ethical standards that should shape their practices as media makers and as participants in online communities?
Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture

After asking these questions, a plan needs to be put in place. How will I ensure that my students are prepared to make ethical decisions?

My Experiences

As an adult it is hard to discern factual information from fake news anymore. I often find myself reading headlines from news stories that appear on my Facebook page and taking that information as truth. Sometimes it is because the headlines align with my beliefs. Therefore, I read the headline and do not look further into the story or where the information came from. This is a bad habit.

The need for quick answers and the 24-hour news cycle has created a culture of people who aren’t THINKing before they share, retweet, or take in the information as the truth. It is so easy for fake news stories to be spread. This is dangerous because people believe this misinformation without fact-checking it. This reporting referred to as circular reporting happens like this. News site A prints a fake story, News site B reprints it, and News site A then sites B as the source. Before you know it, multiplications report on the same fake news story.

How to Slow Down The Spread of a Lie

  1. Avoiding sensational media
  2. Searching for criticisms or suspicious information
  3. Tracing the original source of a report

Taking Action

To support my students in responsibly consuming and sharing information, I am learning about some of the best practices through the resources COETAIL has provided throughout this course as well as using my PLN through COETAIL to learn about what other educators are doing in their schools.

Building a Digital Literacy program that can be used in the elementary school at my current school is a goal of mine. There is not much being done now. The teaching of digital literacy skills is dependent on what individual teachers decide to do. Taking the Responsible Use Tech Agreements from my school and building off of that will be a start. Finding resources that educate parents on digital literacy such as Authenticating Information (Media Smarts) or using Google’s Be Internet Awesome: Digital Safety Resources is a starting point.

I’d love to hear how some of your schools are implementing Digital Literacy and Citizenship into the curriculum. Is there a vertically aligned document or curriculum already out there? I’d like to see what skills are needed and when it is most appropriate to teach those skills.

A Lesson Learned

Perfect Timing

Days before this COETAIL Program started, I was sitting on a beach in the Philippines wondering if my school in Vietnam would be affected by the COVID-19 spread. As I returned to Vietnam, the virus spread was getting worse and we soon got word that school would not be starting back up on time. A week later, we had moved to a home learning program. At the same time, I started COETAIL. In many ways, completing this certification has been a challenge while doing home learning because of the increased amount of time I spend online now. On the other hand, it feels like the perfect time to be doing this program. 

Photo by Buenosia Carol from Pexels

Contributing with a Mistake

For one, during Course 1: Ourselves as Learners, I identified with the term lurker-being more of an observer, rather than a contributor to my PLN. However, before long, I started seeing myself shift towards being more of a contributor. Home Learning and COETAIL were pushing me to be more creative, use tech tools I had never had the time to explore, and develop new material that was accessible to students from home. I was finally excited to share what I had created!

As I was scrolling (a.k.a. lurking) through the Teachers College Writing Workshop Facebook Group, I came across a post from a teacher looking for a second-grade Poetry Unit. Perfect! I had just finished teaching mine and I was proud of the unit I had put together (It was the one I used for my Course 1 Final Project). I quickly linked my unit in the comments and was excited to see how many teachers wanted to use it.

“Alone, we can do so little; together, we can do so much.”

Helen Keller
Photo by Startup Stock Photos from Pexels

My Bad

A few days later, I got an email from one of my student’s parents. She said her daughter had noticed an unknown name resolve a comment that her daughter had made on one of the poems I had assigned in a Google Slideshow. The mother expressed that she is very careful about internet safety regarding her children and she wanted to check to make sure this wasn’t some weird person.

Immediately, I opened the document to check it out and assumed that it was one of the educators from the FB Group who was using my materials. Although, I changed the settings to the documents in the unit to “view” only, that particular slideshow was set to “can comment” so this person was able to resolve the comments. Not a big deal, but the students’ full names were displayed in the comments they had written, which means anyone that had opened this document could see my students’ names. Not cool! Needless to say, I fixed that problem and made sure there was no student information that could be seen from sharing this unit with others (I should have done that before). A lesson learned for sure and thankfully the mom was really understanding.

Learning from Mistakes

This brings me to the second reason I feel COETAIL has come at the perfect time for me. I’d say that right now, my students’ digital presence is at an all-time high. What better time than now to learn more about connecting students online while maintaining privacy for both them and myself.  I know there is value in contributing to online platforms and creating materials that others can use. But I also need to be aware of what I am sharing and what people can see (students’ names, faces, etc.). 

Not only do educators need to be aware of what they are sharing digitally, but they also need to be given schoolwide guidelines regarding students’ internet safety and responsibilities. After working at four school international schools, I’d say this topic is something that is mentioned at the beginning of the year and not really brought up again unless an issue arises. Students at my current school sign a Responsible Technology Use Agreement and that is about it. We are a young, small school, but that doesn’t mean there shouldn’t be a better plan in place; especially when we are handing second graders Chromebooks. 

Photo from Pixabay

Again, the timing of this assignment is perfect. I see an area of weakness at my school and in my own practices. Now, I’ll get the chance to make a difference through my final project in this course-more creating and contributing to my PLN! I am hopeful that with the collaborative effort of my group, we will be able to create something that is helpful for both teachers and students. 

When thinking about what I’d like to create and what my own beliefs are about internet safety and use for students, I found myself really connecting to the beliefs of the writer of The New Childhood: Raising Kids To Thrive In A Connected World, Jordan Shapiro. In his interview with NPR, he mentions that part of his job as a parent is to help his children make sense of their online experiences and teach them how to uphold enduring values in the new world they are living in. That’s my job as a teacher too. I need to prepare students for the world they are currently living in. It doesn’t make any sense for schools to not teach digital citizenship and safety. 

“How are we going to maintain those positive things-the compassion, ethics, good social skills, and intimate relationships, if we’re teaching students to live in a world that doesn’t look like the world they’re living in?”

Shapiro

These are the ideas I want to keep in mind when creating my final course project. I want to help my school work towards establishing better guidelines regarding the use of technology and information. It is the schools’ job to have guidelines to help keep everyone safe. Teachers need to be taught what they can and cannot share. Parents need to be “leaning in” to see what their children are doing online. Ultimately, our goal as educators or parents is to prepare our children for the world they live in. Technology is not going away.

What are some of the great things your schools are doing to educate teachers and students about internet safety and privacy? What are some of the programs you use to teach students digital citizenship? I’d love to hear!